The End of Another Unit, but it’s not going anywhere!

Now that we are at the end of the week, we have finished another unit of the curriculum (yay). On the last day of the unit, we did our egg crash tests, that seemed to all go well in the end. I wanted to explain what Ivana and I did to ensure that our egg would not break and help you to understand why it worked the way it did.

Goal: Egg has to survive a crash test, that is placed in front of a vehicle with ZERO cracks.

Materials we used:

  •  Plastic Container
  • Floral Foam (Fig. 1)

 The way to succeed in getting a good mark was to be able to use materials that are low in mass while being able to have the maximum # of textbook holding the table up (in a inclined plane position), while it is on top of a chair (maximum meaning 10 books).

Ivana and I took the floral foam and shaped it into an egg shape, once the egg totally fit into the mould that we made, we decided to place the egg into a plastic container, which we knew that would protect the egg very well and would not have to worry if the egg was going to crack or not. Once we brought our egg to school and tested it out, it was a success! With the velocity of the ten books and a mass of about 51.9g. 

So how does this work and what factors do you have to think about before starting this experiment?

Some important things to think about:

  • how to reduce the impact
  • make sure the egg is secure so it does not fall out of the vehicle/container
  • get the lowest mass possible while still protecting the egg, think about materials that are less dense.

Once you have an idea of what you will use to make a container that follows those factors, you should be right on your way to a successful egg crash! Of course, I know everyone succeeded today and some people had even way lower masses than ours, I just wanted to explain how I approached this project with Ivana and I hope that you found it interesting!

So, how did you approach your egg crash? Was it similar to how Ivana and I planned it out? Was there anything different that you thought about?  

I also have a short video on a crash test that Ford did that relates to our egg crash test, ignore most of the audio in the video though, as this is a Ford Commercial.

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The Coin Tower (Blog #2)

          On Monday October 20th, I demonstrated my coin tower showing how inertia and friction works. I used a butter knife and a few coins, I stacked the coins into a tower and I used a fast motion by swiping the bottom coin out of the tower. The result was that the tower remained the way it was, but the last coin was removed.

The explanation for why this works is because of Newton’s First Law stating that an object in motion (or at rest) tends to stay in motion (or at rest). Meaning that the coins stacked want to stay at rest while the last coin that I removed follows the force of the butter knife. The gravity of Earth pulls the tower downward and the butter knife pushes the coin to the left or right depending on what side you swipe. This also deals with friction, if I were to use a slow motion and I swiped the bottom coin out of the tower the friction between the last coin and the tower would drag all the coins with itself, resulting in a toppled tower.

You can try out this experiment at home as well by following this video!